InVivoPlus human IgG1 isotype control

Catalog #BP0297
Clone:
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$715.00 - $5,100.00

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Product Details

The human IgG1 isotype control antibody is purified from human myeloma serum and is of unknown specificity. This antibody is suitable for use as a non-targeting isotype control in various in vitro and in vivo studies. It can also be used as a negative control in various diagnostic applications such as ELISA, Western blot, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. For research use only.

Specifications

Isotype Human IgG1, κ
Recommended Dilution Buffer InVivoPure pH 7.0 Dilution Buffer
Formulation PBS, pH 7.0
Contains no stabilizers or preservatives
Endotoxin* <1EU/mg (<0.001EU/μg)
Determined by LAL gel clotting assay
Purity >95%
Determined by SDS-PAGE
Sterility 0.2 μm filtration
Production Purified from human myeloma serum
Purification Protein A
RRID AB_2687817
Molecular Weight 150 kDa
Human Pathogen Test Results Hepatitis B virus: Negative, Hepatitis C virus: Negative, Human immunodeficiency virus: Negative, Syphilis: Negative
Storage The antibody solution should be stored at the stock concentration at 4°C. Do not freeze.
* Additional quality control measures for our InVivoPlus™ products include advanced binding validation, murine pathogen screening, protein aggregation screening, and ultra-low endotoxin levels. The superior quality of our InVivoPlus™ products will meet and exceed the strict demands and rigorous standards required for in vivo research. Learn more about the InVivoPlus™ difference here.

Additional Formats

Li, M., et al. (2019). "Genomic ERBB2/ERBB3 mutations promote PD-L1-mediated immune escape in gallbladder cancer: a whole-exome sequencing analysis" Gut 68(6): 1024-1033. PubMed

OBJECTIVES: Patients with gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) lack effective treatment methods largely due to the inadequacy of both molecular characterisation and potential therapeutic targets. We previously uncovered a spectrum of genomic alterations and identified recurrent mutations in the ErbB pathway in GBC. Here, we aimed to study recurrent mutations of genes and pathways in a larger cohort of patients with GBC and investigate the potential mechanisms and clinical significance of these mutations. DESIGN: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 157 patients with GBC. Functional experiments were applied in GBC cell lines to explore the oncogenic roles of ERBB2/ERBB3 hotspot mutations, their correlation with PD-L1 expression and the underlying mechanisms. ERBB inhibitors and a PD-L1 blocker were used to evaluate the anticancer activities in co-culture systems in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: WES identified ERBB2 and ERBB3 mutations at a frequency of 7%-8% in the expanded cohort, and patients with ERBB2/ERBB3 mutations exhibited poorer prognoses. A set of in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed increased proliferation/migration on ERBB2/ERBB3 mutation. Ectopic expression of ERBB2/ERBB3 mutants upregulated PD-L1 expression in GBC cells, effectively suppressed normal T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro through activation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and contributed to the growth and progression of GBC in vivo. Treatment with an ERBB2/ERBB3 inhibitor or a PD-L1 monoclonal antibody reversed these immunosuppressive effects, and combined therapy revealed promising therapeutic activities. CONCLUSIONS: ERBB2/ERBB3 mutations may serve as useful biomarkers in identifying patients who are sensitive to ERBB2/ERBB3 inhibitors and PD-L1 monoclonal antibody treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02442414;Pre-results.