InVivoMAb human IgG1 isotype control

Catalog #BE0297

$164.00 - $4,280.00

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  • 100 mg - $4,280.00
  • 50 mg - $3,024.00
  • 25 mg - $2,009.00
  • 5 mg - $600.00
  • 1 mg - $164.00
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Product Details

The human IgG1 isotype control antibody is purified from human myeloma serum and is of unknown specificity. This antibody is suitable for use as a non-targeting isotype control in various in vitro and in vivo studies. It can also be used as a negative control in various diagnostic applications such as ELISA, Western blot, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. For research use only.

Specifications

Isotype Human IgG1, κ
Recommended Dilution Buffer InVivoPure pH 7.0 Dilution Buffer
Conjugation This product is unconjugated. Conjugation is available via our Antibody Conjugation Services.
Formulation PBS, pH 7.0
Contains no stabilizers or preservatives
Endotoxin <2EU/mg (<0.002EU/μg)
Determined by LAL gel clotting assay
Purity >95%
Determined by SDS-PAGE
Sterility 0.2 µm filtration
Production Purified from human myeloma serum
Purification Protein A
RRID AB_2687817
Molecular Weight 150 kDa
Human Pathogen Test Results Hepatitis B Surface Antigen: Negative
Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 antibodies: Negative
Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 antibodies: Negative
Hepatitis C Virus antibodies: Negative
* These tests cannot guarantee the absence of infective agents
Storage The antibody solution should be stored at the stock concentration at 4°C. Do not freeze.

Additional Formats

Li, M., et al. (2019). "Genomic ERBB2/ERBB3 mutations promote PD-L1-mediated immune escape in gallbladder cancer: a whole-exome sequencing analysis" Gut 68(6): 1024-1033. PubMed

OBJECTIVES: Patients with gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) lack effective treatment methods largely due to the inadequacy of both molecular characterisation and potential therapeutic targets. We previously uncovered a spectrum of genomic alterations and identified recurrent mutations in the ErbB pathway in GBC. Here, we aimed to study recurrent mutations of genes and pathways in a larger cohort of patients with GBC and investigate the potential mechanisms and clinical significance of these mutations. DESIGN: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 157 patients with GBC. Functional experiments were applied in GBC cell lines to explore the oncogenic roles of ERBB2/ERBB3 hotspot mutations, their correlation with PD-L1 expression and the underlying mechanisms. ERBB inhibitors and a PD-L1 blocker were used to evaluate the anticancer activities in co-culture systems in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: WES identified ERBB2 and ERBB3 mutations at a frequency of 7%-8% in the expanded cohort, and patients with ERBB2/ERBB3 mutations exhibited poorer prognoses. A set of in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed increased proliferation/migration on ERBB2/ERBB3 mutation. Ectopic expression of ERBB2/ERBB3 mutants upregulated PD-L1 expression in GBC cells, effectively suppressed normal T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro through activation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and contributed to the growth and progression of GBC in vivo. Treatment with an ERBB2/ERBB3 inhibitor or a PD-L1 monoclonal antibody reversed these immunosuppressive effects, and combined therapy revealed promising therapeutic activities. CONCLUSIONS: ERBB2/ERBB3 mutations may serve as useful biomarkers in identifying patients who are sensitive to ERBB2/ERBB3 inhibitors and PD-L1 monoclonal antibody treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02442414;Pre-results.

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